Blogs > emotions

Emotions?

Are they more rational than what we give it credit for?

Dr. Paras
Dr. Paras
Nov 08, 2016
Emotions? by Dr. Paras

Two separate gears, rotating in opposite directions, tend to create motion. Many among us tend to assume that decision-making process is similar to gears. Emotional/Impulsive and Rational/Intelligent way of thinking. Common thoughts say, emotional decisions are more impulsive and they tend to seduce us into taking a wrong decision. Whereas, the rational decision, which is the path of intelligence guide us into taking the right route out. But the truth is both are inseparable.

In many occasions, decisions based on emotions and intuitions could be far more efficient than a well thought out intellectual one. A study conducted at the University of California at Santa Barbara indicates that in situations in which we are moderately angry our ability to distinguish between relevant and irrelevant claims in disputed issues is sharpened. Another study reveals that an individual’s inclination towards anger in a situation is higher when one benefits from anger. To simplify, there is logic in emotion and emotion in logic.

“When dealing with people, let us remember we are not dealing with creatures of logic. We are dealing with creatures of emotion, creatures bristling with prejudices and motivated by pride and vanity.”

? Dale Carnegie

Emotions create an energy which in turn creates a prospective action. The prospective action can be positive or negative. The challenge remains in trying to get our emotions to see logic. In many situations, people react based on emotions. People tend to justify their actions with logic and facts. We persuade ourselves and the ones around us with these reasons. A logical reason will never appeal to emotions. Logic can never win over emotions and emotions on the other hand always win over logic. Just the way imagination has an upper hand over reality.

People tend to justify their actions with logic and facts. We persuade ourselves and the ones around us with these reasons. A logical reason will never appeal to emotions. Logic can never win over emotions and emotions on the other hand always win over logic. Just the way imagination has an upper hand over reality.

So, what stirs up logical decisions? Are we as a human race rational? Do we always follow logic? Do we act only if it feels right? Do we always want facts before we act? Let me draw your attention to a simple exercise here. Lizards! Many fear them! For a fact, all know there is not much harm that the tiny creature crawling on the wall can do. But still, logic fails when the emotion of fear takes over. Try talking logic to the person who is engulfed in the flames of fear upon seeing that tiny creature on the door. It would make no sense to them! It’s useless trying to use logic and persuading this individual, that their fears and actions don’t make sense. This person remains convinced that there is a problem.

There is a new theory that has come into light now, that says, the human brain relies on two separate networks. One that determines the risks vs. rewards, individual choices and ultimately a clear reflection of how one behaves. Behavior here is the key word. Our behavior, attitude, habits and responses to situation control our thinking and thought process.

Logical decisions are made when there is enough evidence produced. And Irrational decision is commonly evident during 3 different emotional conditions. Depression, Anger & Frustration. It's commonly known that depression is often triggered (and maintained) by fundamentally irrational thoughts. Many thoughts and feelings associated with depression are parallel to the fundamentals of irrationality. Guilt, hopelessness, worthlessness are patterns in the belief system that assumes it can never be a part of real word.

Rationality is a habit. Which in a nutshell means it works in accordance to the facts and the reality! The alternative to this remains acting by the spur of the moment. Which will result in a domino effect causing undesired consequences though the consistency remains vital here. Actions that are based on belief systems in particular effect relationships. This, however, will not occur if the relationship remains invalid.

Our brain is like a puppy. The more you do something, the more the brain gets used to it and it slowly becomes a habit.

Another consequence of acting irrationally, labels you as a person who is not capable of acting rationally in the future. Choosing to act irrationally is like a confession. You confess that you do not believe your own mind. Our brain is like a puppy. The more you do something, the more the brain gets used to it and it slowly becomes a habit. You believe in what you practice. You accept your mind is impotent and cannot make the decisions that are rational and right. It cuts away the perspective of a reason, which is optimal for human survival.

Fantasies. What are they? Why do we tend to live in a zone where everything is super illuminated? What happens to our thoughts at that moment? What do we feel? One more exercise here. Think of the first day you walk into an office? You meet your trainer at the induction. The trainer looks amazing with corporate attire and demeanor that says I am confident. You on the other hand, hypothetically speaking can be timid, reserved and not too spoken. You mind starts to fill up with images of you dressed and behaving like your trainer. What goes on in your mind at that point and how long you hold on to that image creates an aura around you. So what am saying? Are fantasies good? Or, are they bad?

Come back to read more about how fantasies, depression, anxiety and anger rule your rational thinking zone. 

Comments